What is Jindagi?

 

If you’ve read about me then you already know about my love affair with traveling but what you don’t know is that while I’m out exploring the world, I also love to buy handmade products from local artisans or crafts(wo)men. Throughout my travels I’ve gathered a fair share of pottery, textiles, paintings, wood carvings, jewelry – anything that catches my eye but even more importantly my heart.

It brings me immense joy knowing I’ve contributed to true artisans who work passionately and relentlessly doing something they believe in. Not only does their work give them a stable income but they also take great pride in keeping local handicrafts alive – especially in a world of ever-growing big box industries.

 

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I’ve always wanted to share with others all the wonderful things I discovered on my travels but just never had the courage to do it – until I went to India. Even before going, I knew I would be faced with an array of colorful, unique and irresistible handicrafts (and I was afraid for my wallet). I had then decided it was time for me to throw myself into yet another entrepreneurial adventure – to offer the opportunity for others to purchase handmade items from my travels.

During my two months in India, I patiently sourced out artisans, bargained aggressively (but politely) with merchants and pushed my way around street markets carefully handpicking every single item. I chose to only buy from the friendliest and most welcoming merchants – those who still had that sparkle in their eyes when showing me their wares. Upon my return, I created my Facebook page under the name Jindagi – which means ‘life’ in Hindi. Since then, I’ve been selling online (locally & internationally), at venues and to friends & family.

It truly warms my heart when people appreciate the origin and the journey of each item – knowing it was made in another part of the world most people aren’t likely to travel to. My goal is to continue sourcing out unique items from every country I visit. So if you don’t want to miss out on a one-of-a-kind piece of jewelry, a genuinely handmade scarf or even a dhurrie handwoven by a family in a remote village – then follow, like and share my purchasing adventures on Jindagi.

 

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Admiring Mr. Mohamad’s work – a handmade bhandani (tie-dyed) scarf

 

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Handmade vintage pendant worn by Gujarati tribal women

 

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Turquoise & coral bracelet – handmade in Dharamsala

 

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A small pouch made with vintage hand-stitched textiles

 

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The art of handwoven dhurries has been passed on from generation to generation

 

 

What do you like to bring back from your travels? What’s your favorite travel souvenir? 

 

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  • Frank Thomae

    That’s something we love as well Lydia – picking up things (mostly textiles, sometimes carvings or masks) from our travels. I’ve got a large sun umbrella that I picked up outside Chiang Mai many years ago as well as a buffalo-tooth sword I got in Sumatra. Best travel souvenirs ever. I hope you succeed in making a business out of it, nothing more fun than doing well in something you love.

    • Lydia@Lifeuntraveled.com

      A sun umbrella and a sword?! I usually try to stick to stuff that fits in my bags (cause I’m too cheap to pay for shipping)…..lol! Thanks – I’ve already sold a lot of stuff but eventually I’ll be opening an on-line shop. 🙂